Celebrity Talk Is Cheap, So They Say…

I’ve noticed a trend among conservative or right-leaning individuals in the US to bash the opinion of celebrities which are often more left-leaning and liberal. This strikes me as really odd.

I’m not even one to be awestruck by celebrities…I’m kinda put off by our country’s celebrity worship culture…but to bash celebrities for having an opinion? Something about that rubs me the wrong way.

gritte-346468-unsplashThe arguments against celebrity opinion have had a couple of different facets, regardless of whether the celebrities in question are artists like singers, actors, and comedians or athletes:

  1. Celebrities have a huge following among the national and even the world population, making their extracurricular activities particularly vile because their opinions contaminate the thinking of large swaths of people who look up to them.
  2. Celebrities get paid money to do whatever it is they do and therefore they should simply stick to that and nothing else. Like a certain Fox News person coached Lebron James recently, “Shut up and dribble.”
  3. Celebrities live in gilded mansions with bodyguards and have no idea how common people live so therefore their opinion has no value in the real world.
  4. Celebrities by and large exhibit a liberal point of view, one where anything goes and any manner of amoral behavior is perfectly acceptable.
  5. Celebrities contribute nothing of value to society, unlike the common man who holds down a “real” job, so the very platform upon which celebrities exist in the first place has no merit whatsoever, destroying any credibility they could possibly have to express their opinions.

Let’s break these arguments down.

1. Celebrities have a huge following and unduly influence whole populations of people.

Yes, people become famous for all kinds of reasons. And other people will follow the antics of the rich and famous for all sorts of reasons. For heaven’s sake, there was even a show about this on TV several years ago. I never watched it. The showcasing of how people flaunt their wealth never appealed to me. Instead I admired people who used their wealth or their talents to positively impact the world around them. But I digress.

Sometimes a celebrity’s efforts are awe-inspiring, like Olympians who train for years to hone their skill. Olympians understand sacrifice, humility, teamwork, sportsmanship, rules, endurance, strength, failure, perseverance, disappointment, success, luck, and glory. Other people are eager to connect on a personal level with these individuals, to understand what it takes to be a champion, what it takes to be the best in a given sport. Because more often than not, the characteristics these athletes exhibit are transcendent, traits that can be applied and lead to success in real life. Despite the Herculean efforts these athletes exhibit, the common man connects deeply to these stories of human triumph.

Even if someone isn’t Olympic caliber, as an athlete they still have a talent, and a passion or zest for the sport that got them to national or sometimes international levels of recognition. Many of the same attributes apply.  There is a reason why so many parents want their kids to play a sport because of the life skills it teaches them. Sure, some parents only see dollar signs and want their kids to make it big, but there is inherent value delivered via sports that is realized later in life. Certainly it’s inspiring for a kid to see someone who happens to look like them also be the best they can be.

Much of the same could be said for actors and musicians, really. Those kinds of celebrities touch people’s hearts in an altogether different way, an emotional one. But that’s just like life, isn’t it? It takes all sorts of people to make the world go round, and some people value the heart over the body and vice versa.  Actors and musicians and writers literally tell the stories of our humanity. They elicit a huge range of emotions and replay the ancient tales of what it means to be human. To be able to do that well, to touch us or get us to laugh even in dire times, is a gift.

So sure, actors and musicians, comedians and writers, are admired for their work, and they are asked about what it takes to get there. But it doesn’t stop there. These artists are often inspired by the people whose stories they tell, inspired enough oftentimes to want to be an advocate for change when they aren’t on stage. Sometimes their art is a parallel to what goes on in American life. How can these artists tell a story and avoid talking about what it means to them personally, especially when they are interviewed and asked those very questions? They are gifted storytellers of their chosen medium…of course they are asked about their work, and use their gift to tell the story yet again and again but in a different way.

Now granted, there are celebrities who are famous simply for being famous. Take Paris Hilton…whose only claim to fame was her family money. Her antics were ridiculous. And yet she somehow got her own “reality” TV show which only served to prolong and heighten her fame. I saw no redeeming value in Paris Hilton. I couldn’t understand people who wanted to emulate her, or who just outright adored her. Maybe she was adorable, but she mostly played dumb. I wasn’t a fan of her for all those reasons…I tried to avoid her but it was hard to escape her influence on pop culture for those several years she was the It Girl.

And then there are the people who become celebrities for infamous reasons…like the over-tanned mom, or the over-zealous, misguided, trigger-happy vigilantes like George Zimmerman. Go figure. Our First Amendment gives all kinds of people a platform to use their voice for their 15 minutes of fame or to prolong it even further on Twitter and social media as they now have the option to do.

No doubt, if you have a way to touch millions of people, you’ve been given a gift beyond the art or the physical prowess that got you there in the first place. The Bible says we should not hide our light under a bushel. For better or worse, celebrities use a gift that was given to them.

2. Celebrities get paid to do what they do. They should do that and nothing more. I.e., “Shut up and dribble.”

Yeah. I have a problem with the “shut up and dribble” kinds of statements. It sounds so incredibly sinister to me, like a master to a slave, not to mention the overtly racial overtones directed toward Lebron James.  This is akin to saying, “Shut your piehole. I don’t care one wit about you as a human being. You are here purely for my entertainment and enjoyment, period. I command you do to what I want and nothing more!”


Can you imagine saying something like that to a waiter? “Shut up and deliver my food.” Or a teacher? “Shut up and teach my kid.” Or a mechanic? “Shut up and service my car.”

In a society where we recognize that we should acknowledge each other as human beings, see the whole person, connect with one another and engage in dialogue….we have a part of society that looks down on others as if they were servants instead of equals.

Even if that isn’t what people mean, that’s how it sounds. And that’s downright ugly.

Good thing Ronald Reagan didn’t follow that sort of advice long ago. Where would we be as a nation without The Great Orator? Should he have stuck with acting? Was it wrong for him to evolve into a governor, and then a president?

3. Celebrities live in gilded mansions with bodyguards and insane amounts of money. They have no idea how the common people live and couldn’t possibly speak on their behalf.

Certainly there are certain celebrities who were born into rich and famous families, and they could very well be out of touch with the average American. Jane Fonda, I’m looking at you.

However the vast majority of celebrities grew up in average families like you and me. They didn’t have gobs of money growing up. They didn’t have bodyguards. They didn’t jet-set around the world or live in mansions. Sometimes they struggled for years before they made it big…struggled on a level that the average American with a steady job can’t appreciate.

And there are celebrities who have been rich and famous for decades, part of that enormous Baby Boom generation that has so strongly influenced American life for 40-50 years now. Over time they may have forgotten what it was like when they were young. They hire bodyguards for sure, because even benign crazy people don’t respect personal space or personal property, and some level of protection is completely reasonable.

But to bitch and moan that celebrities are out of touch with the common man? As if these people don’t deal with illness and sorrow, insults and betrayal, death and destruction… These unhappy events come for us all over the course of a lifetime. Some of us become more somber and wise because of it, and some of them embrace the joy of life even harder as a result.

4. Celebrities by and large exhibit a liberal point of view where anything goes, including all kinds of amoral behavior.

Yes, all kinds of celebrities exhibit a liberal point of view, and a whole bunch of them are conservative too. Perhaps we should disregard the esteemed opinions of Scott Baio, Clint Eastwood (who was talking to an empty chair on national television a few years ago), and Stacey Dash, who’s now running for Congress. Should I list a few more? Who was it that visited the White House last year? Kid Rock and Ted Nugent? Role models, are they?

And what about this criticism of amoral behavior? I struggle with this one a bit. Is it amoral when pastor Joel Osteen refused to open his enormous church to hundreds of Houstonians in need of shelter post hurricane, even though that is exactly what Christ coaches us to do?

Or is “love is love is love is love is love is love” amoral?

I’m confused by this. One man’s morality is another man’s sin. It isn’t quite as binary as you might want to believe it is.

5. Celebrities contribute nothing of value to society, rendering invalid their platform to speak, unlike people with “real” jobs.

Really? I suppose I could repeat all of my earlier points on this one. As a society, we place value on what celebrities say and do, for good and bad. Some of us have exerted a certain level of effort to be in the spotlight…a moving piece of art, a sacrifice and precision in sport that enthralls us, an ability to communicate that connects with our souls and minds. These celebrities came from somewhere to get where they are. They come from us.

If you had a platform, you’d use it too. You use it every time you share your own opinion at the coffee shop, water cooler, or Facebook. Celebrities just happen to have a much larger audience than you.

Maybe I just have a soft spot for expressive types, since I am one myself and I feel most at home around those sorts of people too.

Surprise! Now I want you to go back through each of my points. You could easily make the argument that Donald Trump is one of those celebrities that people disdain so much. For heaven’s sake…he came from money he didn’t earn himself. Lived in a bubble his entire life, a gilded penthouse literally. Never held a common man’s job and avoided military service when he was needed. He is a reality TV star and that was the extent of his celebrity to a very large degree until he graduated to the biggest stage in the world. Until this election, he held a liberal point of view. ANYTHING goes with this guy. He is the very definition of amoral.

Tell me again how celebrities ought to shut up. It would be a boring world indeed if they did. It seems to me you can’t complain about some celebrities and not all of them. Like it or not, their opinions are here to stay.

Image by Gritte on unsplash.com

Author: silonda

I'm not your average Midwestern American woman: an older mom to three kids and married to a musician. I've worked as a business professional my entire adult life but an artist inhabits my soul. Wonderlust (i.e., insatiable curiosity) and wanderlust lead me to read and travel, while my introverted self prefers to quietly observe and share what I discover through writing. Deep thinking and feeling is my default mode. I'm constantly striving to create beauty and love UP.

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